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Articles in English

Israel vs. the United Nations

Yasser Arafat—Legacy or Lunacy?

Israel: No Peace, No Process?

The Israeli Press Reacts to the Road Map: Bumpy Road Ahead

The Israeli Press Reacts to the Prisoner Exchange with Hizbollah

Israel’s Security Fence—Back To The Wall

A Woman President in the White House?

New York Stories:
Freedom of Speech

New York Stories:
9/11—Tilting at Windmills

German Press on Iraq:
Front Line Berlin

Bush Takes On Europe—Again

A European in New York

Jewish Lawyers Defending Anti-Semites?

Cooperation and Competition — American Jewry and Israel's Development

In Memoriam Yehuda Amichai

In Memoriam Hildegard Knef

2000... And the Emperor Still Has No Clothes

 

People Making Headlines in...

2004

2003

2002

2001

2000

 

French Media:

Agence France-Presse
(International news service),
Paris http://www.afp.fr/

Ad-Dawliya
(Arab-oriented weekly), Paris

Alternatives Algériennes
(Expatriate Algerian bimonthly),
Paris

Ca M'Intéresse
(Science monthly), Paris
http://www.caminteresse.fr

Charlie Hebdo
(Left-wing satirical weekly),
Paris

Croissance
(Left-wing monthly), Paris

Corse-Matin
Ajaccio
http://www.coresematin.com

Europ
(Quarterly, EU-oriented), Paris
http://www.europmag.com

France-Soir
(Mass-circulation), Paris

Jeune Afrique-L'intelligent
(Independent newsmagazine),
Paris
http://www.jeuneafrique.com/

La Depeche
(Regional Daily), Toulouse
http://www.ladepeche.com/

La Recherche
Paris
http://www.larecherche.fr

La Tribune
(Business-oriented), Paris
http://www.latribune.fr

La Voix du Nord
(Regional Daily), Lille
http://www.lavoixdunord.fr/

L'Alsace
(Regional), Strasbourg
http://www.alsapresse.com/

La Croix L'Evénement
(Catholic-oriented), Paris

La Marseillaise
(Communist), Marseilles

L'Aurore
(Conservative), Paris

L'Autre Afrique
(Independent newsmagazine),
Paris

Le Figaro
(Conservative), Paris
http://www.lefigaro.fr/

Le Monde
(Liberal), Paris
http://www.lemonde.fr

Le Monde des Religions
(bimonthly magazine), Paris
http://www.lavie.presse.fr/

Le Monde diplomatique
(Liberal monthly), Paris
www.monde-diplomatique.fr/

Le Nouvel Observateur
(Left-wing weekly), Paris
http://www.nouvelobs.com/

Le Parisien
(Centrist), Paris
http://www.leparisien.fr/

Le Point
(Conservative newsmagazine), Paris http://www.lepoint.fr/

Les Echos
(Conservative), Paris
http://www.lesechos.com/

L'Expansion
(Biweekly business magazine),
Paris
http://www.lexpansion.com

L'Express
(Centrist newsmagazine), Paris
http://www.lexpress.fr/

L'Humanité
(Communist Party), Paris
http://www.humanite.presse.fr/

Le Canard Enchaîné
(Satirical weekly), Paris

Le Herisson
(Humor weekly), Paris

Le Journal du Dimanche
(Mass-circulation weekly), Paris

Le Nouvel Afrique Asie
(Left-wing Third World-oriented
monthly), Paris

Le Nouvel Economiste
(Business weekly), Paris

Le Quotidien de Paris
(Conservative), Paris

Lettres Internationale
(Literary monthly), Paris

L'Evénement du Jeudi
(Liberal weekly), Paris

Libération
(Left-wing), Paris
http://www.liberation.fr

Lire
(Cultural monthly), Paris
http://www.lire.fr

Libertitres
(Review of the African press),
Montferriez sur Lez

Magazine Littéraire
(Monthly literary magazine),
Paris
www.magazine-litteraire.com/

Maghreb Hebdo
(Independent weekly), Paris

Marianne
(Weekly newsmagazine), Paris
http://www.marianne-en-ligne.fr/

Nice-Matin
(Conservative), Nice
http://www.nicematin.fr/

Ouest France
(Regional Daily), Rennes
http://www.france-ouest.com

Paris Match
(Mass-circulation weekly),
Paris
http://www.parismatch.com/

Politis
(alternative left-wing weekly magazine), Paris
http://www.politis.fr/

Science et Vie
(Science monthly), Paris
http://www.science-et-vie.com/

Sciences et Avenir
(Science and technology monthly),
Paris
http://www.sciences-et-avenir.com/index2.html

Syfia
(International news agency),
Montpellier
http://www.syfia.com/

UNESCO Courier
(UNESCO monthly), Paris
http://www.unesco.org/courier/

7 Jours d'Europe
(EU weekly), Paris/Brussels

Vaguement Compétitis
Paris

VSD
(Mass-circulation weekly),
Paris


 

The World Press on...France

 

Home Page > Articles in English > The Press On France

 

 

From the August 2003 issue of World Press Review

Rien Ne Va Plus

By Tekla Szymanski

Sources:
L’Express (centrist newsmagazine), Paris
Le Monde (liberal), Paris
Le Figaro (conservative), Paris
Le Nouvel Observateur (left-wing weekly), Paris
Libération (left-wing), Paris
La Tribune (business-oriented), Paris

 

Europe’s social politics are coming undone. Financially unsustainable national pension systems have forced country after country to face up to painful reforms and tighten the belt. Proposals to cut retirement benefits or increase the age of retirement, however, have fueled protests across the continent. First in Germany, then Austria, Italy, and now France: Union workers are determined to fight back. “[France] is suffering from ‘social malaria,’ ” claimed Christophe Barbier in L’Express (June 6, 2003), “A chronic disease that won’t kill it but will sap all
its strength.”

The country is caught up in crippling union-led strikes and sometimes violent mass demonstrations. “A trial of strength has begun between the government and sections of the population,” observed Jean-Marie Colombani in Le Monde (May 27). On May 13, dubbed “Black Tuesday” by the French media, and again on June 3, transport came to a standstill. And in contrast to what the editors of Le Figaro had claimed (June 4), that the protest movement seemed to be running out of steam, June 10 brought another round of strikes and demonstrations.

On May 28, France’s center-right government had approved a draft bill that would gradually increase the required period of contributions to pension funds. In addition, the retirement age would be adjusted from the current average of 55 to 60-65 in 2020. “One word…sums up the spirit of this decisive month of June,” opined Barbier in L’Express (June 6). “The word is confusion.” Analysts predict that without reforms, France’s pension system will collapse in 20 years, and the country will follow Germany into a deep recession. “There is no alternative,” observed Jean-Marcel Bouguereau in Le Nouvel Observateur (June 4). “[Fance] allowed itself for the past decade to be lulled by the comfortable illusions of the leisure society...for which we may now have to pay dearly.”

The French media strongly criticized Prime Minister Jean-Pierre Raffarin’s willingness to push through rigid reforms no matter the costs, and some commentators called for a referendum on the issue. “[The government] has committed the sin of arrogance,” snipped a Le Monde editorial (May 22). “The failure to act by successive governments has merely augmented the cost and the urgency of reform,” added Charles Wyplosz in Libération (June 2). “All of the choices are difficult, but we are going to have to live with them.”

The central bone of contention is the government’s attempt to stop favoring the public sector, where workers retire earlier, over the private sector. Public-sector workers are determined not to lose their privileges. “The revolt of the civil service” is how Ivan Rioufol, writing in Le Figaro (May 30), mockingly described the opposition movement. “It is trying to get a foothold with the encouragement of the left....What a fine masquerade!”

Polls show that there is no enthusiasm for the reforms—“Since when do sheep sing praises of their shearers?” Philippe Mudry wrote in La Tribune (June 4). But private-sector workers are not joining the protests; they have nothing to lose.

 

Home Page > Articles in English > The Press On France